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New Spring 2022 Publications

New Genealogy Books

Coming on the heels of the publication of the two-volume Scots Irish Links, 1525-1825: Consolidated Edition, by David Dobson, we are pleased to announce three other new books by Dr. Dobson. Each of these Spring 2022 titles identifies inhabitants of a different region in Scotland between 1800 and 1850. 

Also available now is the latest book in Joseph Lee Boyle’s series of New England runaway servant abstracts taken from contemporary newspapers on the eve of the American Revolution. Please read on for details.  


People of Dundee and Angus, 1800-1850

This book identifies residents in the adjacent counties of Dundee and Angus, as well as emigrants from there, between 1800 and 1850. Dundee and Angus now form distinct Scottish administrative units but were formerly a single district known as Forfarshire. The information is derived from a wide range of sources such as court records, contemporary newspapers and journals, monumental inscriptions, and documents found in archives. The entries bring together emigrants, their destinations– especially in North America, the West Indies, and Australasia– with their kin who remained in Scotland, and provide the resident’s name, specific location, a date, and the source. In many cases the abstracts also identifies the names of kin, occupations, and other pertinent facts. View Book Details


The People of Inverness at Home and Abroad, 1800-1850

The book contains references to people from Inverness-shire, at home and abroad, between 1800 and 1850. Inverness-shire itself was the home of several important clans, such as the McKenzies, the Frasers, the Grants, the McIntoshes, the McPhersons, the McGillivrays, the McBeans, the McQueens, the Davidsons, the Camerons, and other members of Clan Chattan.   Based on sources similar to those consulted for the Dundee and Angus volume above, this work also derives from the Statistical Report of Scotland, compiled between 1791 and 1799; the New Statistical Report, researched between 1832 and 1845; and the publications of the Gaelic Society of Inverness.   The entries in this volume bring together emigrants, their destinations– especially in North America, the West Indies, and Australasia– with their kin who remained in Scotland, and provide the resident’s name, specific location, a date, the source, and sometimes more. View Book Details


The People of Argyll, Bute, and Dunbarton at Home and Abroad, 1800-1850

This book contains references to people of the counties of Argyll, Bute, and Dunbarton, at home and abroad, between 1800 and 1850. These counties lie roughly north-west of Glasgow from the Firth of Clyde to the Firth of Lorne, together with Mull and some smaller islands. The major families or clans found in this region were the Campbells, McDonalds, McLeans, MacAulays, Galbraiths, McLachlans, Malcolms, McMillans, McEwans, McDougalls, McQuarries, McKinnons, McGregors, McIntyres, McFarlanes, Colquhouns, Lamonts, and Buchanans. Most of the people identified here were recorded in contemporary sources, such as court records, newspapers, journals, and monumental inscriptions.  Most entries bring together emigrants, their places of origin and destination, especially in North America and Australasia, with their kin who remained in Scotland. View Book Details


“very apt to speak one side of the truth,” NEW ENGLAND RUNAWAYS, 1774-1777

This work marks Joseph Lee Boyle’s fourth volume of colonial New England runaways, as identified in contemporary newspaper ads. (The first three volumes covered the period 1704-1754, 1755-1768, and 1769-1773 respectively.) The majority of the individuals in this compilation are runaway servants and slaves, but a number are runaway apprentices–both men and women—and military deserters, with horse thieves, counterfeiters, burglars, jail breakers, an occasional murderer, and other lowlifes represented, as well as quite a few allegedly errant spouses. A number of the runaways were skilled, including butchers, bakers, coopers, carpenters, joiners, farriers, shoemakers and tailors, no doubt reflecting New England’s more settled society. In compiling the present work, Mr. Boyle examined over a score of newspapers from New England to Maryland. Each ad in this collection conveys a number of details about the runaway and his/her master, including names and aliases of the runaway, physical description, personality quirks if any, location in New England (including the future states of Vermont and Maine), and where to contact the advertiser.  View Book Details

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