Family History books

Family Stories . . . and How I Found Mine, Chapter 8: Promised Land—Birmingham to Bountiful, 1860s, by J. Michael Cleverley

Over the course of the last few months, we’ve published a number of excerpts from J. Michael Cleverley’s intriguing book, Family Stories . . . and How I found Mine. We’ve followed the Cleverley ancestors from the court of William the Conqueror, to the intrigues of the British nobility on the eve of the War[…]Read more

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genealogy evidence analysis

“Family History Standards,” by Elizabeth Shown Mills

Excerpted from Evidence Explained: Citing History Sources from Artifacts to Cyberspace,3d ed. rev. (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 2017), pp. 18–19, §1.5. “Modern family history (aka genealogy) draws heavily from law in its handling of evidence. However, family-history standards require a higher level of proof than does most litigation.  The justice system demands that a date[…]Read more

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Analyzing Genealogical Research Problems

Analyzing Genealogical Research Problems

By Laura Murphy DeGrazia, CG Excerpted from: Laura Murphy DeGrazia, “Problem Analyses & Research Plans,” Elizabeth Shown Mills, ed., Professional Genealogy: Preparation, Practice & Standards(Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 2018), 295–316. “Effective problem analysis requires a thorough understanding of three key issues. First, we must know the available sources for that problem—their accessibility, arrangement, content, and varying[…]Read more

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Royal Descents

Royal Families: Americans of Royal and Noble Ancestry, by Marston Watson

Royalty and titled nobility in America? Not exactly. No titles of duke, marquess, earl, viscount or baron are bestowed on men, nor titles of duchess, marchioness, countess, viscountess and baroness are granted to women in the United States of America. Nevertheless, hundreds of our seventeenth-century immigrants shed their noble titles for freedom from religious persecution or economic restrictions. Most of these[…]Read more

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Genealogy for kids

Roots for Kids. A GENEALOGY GUIDE FOR YOUNG PEOPLE Joins Roots for Kids. FINDING YOUR FAMILY STORIES

Over the last few weeks we have been telling our readers about Susan Provost Beller’s brand new book, Roots for Kids. Finding Your Family Stories. This beautifully illustrated small book is designed primarily for younger children and provides them with fun activities they can engage in with their parents. Finding Your Family Stories enables children[…]Read more

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Genealogy Timeline

History for Genealogists. Using Chronological Time Lines to find and Understand Your Ancestors

By Judy Jacobson Finally! A history book written expressly for family sleuths–History for Genealogists, Using Chronological Time Lines to find and Understand Your Ancestors.  With this book, accomplished author Judy Jacobson returns with a vast array of historical time lines that are guaranteed to inform your family history. Consider the following illustrations:  If you have[…]Read more

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Family Stories . . . and How I Found Mine, Chapter 7: Soldiers, Survival, Sorrow, by J. Michael Cleverley

Family Stories . . . and How I Found Mine, Chapter 7: Soldiers, Survival, Sorrow, by J. Michael Cleverley

In the September 15 issue of “Genealogy Pointers,” we traced author J. Michael Cleveley’s ancestors to Rhode Island on the eve of the American Revolution, as they attempt to organize a militia company to support the Patriot cause. Nearly a century later, we learn that those Rhode Islanders’ descendants are struggling to establish themselves on[…]Read more

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Creating a Research Plan to Solve Our Research Problem

By Laura Murphy DeGrazia, CG Excerpted from Laura Murphy DeGrazia, “Problem Analyses & Research Plans,” Elizabeth Shown Mills, ed.,  Professional Genealogy: Preparation, Practice & Standards (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 2018), 295–316. Publisher’s Note: Last week we ran an excerpt from Laura Murphy DeGrazia’s chapter, “Problem Analyses & Research Plans,” published in Professional Genealogy: Preparation, Practice &[…]Read more

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