Scottish Genealogy: The Basics and Beyond

Excerpt from Scottish Genealogy: The Basics and Beyond, by David Dobson

Today we are highlighting the first of several sections from Dr. David Dobson’s new book, Scottish Genealogy: The Basics and Beyond. The product of Mr. Dobson’s fifty years of research in Scotland, the British Isles, continental Europe and beyond, this new book is guaranteed to introduce researchers with Scottish ancestry to sources they’ve never laid[…]Read more

Posted on Leave a comment
New Genealogy Books

New December Releases from Genealogical.com

Check out our new releases for December 2020. Three new genealogy reference works available now from Genealogical.com. “much given to Talk and bad Company.” New-England Runaways, 1704-1754By Joseph Lee Boyle Mr. Boyle, who has heretofore extracted the runaway servant newspaper ads for the Middle Atlantic colonies/states, (MD, DE, NJ, PA & NY), now turns his[…]Read more

Posted on 1 Comment
New Genealogy Books April 2020

New and Newly Available Titles for April

Topping this week’s list of newly available titles is the 2nd edition of the Ernest Thode’s popular research aid, Genealogy at a Glance: German Genealogy Research.  Whereas the original edition of “German Genealogy Research” was issued in 2011, the 2nd edition incorporates all the major changes in German genealogy over the past decade, including all[…]Read more

Posted on Leave a comment

Announcing | HOW TO FIND YOUR FAMILY HISTORY IN U.S. CHURCH RECORDS: A Genealogist’s Guide.

With Specific Resources for Major Christian Denominations before 1900 By Sunny Jane Morton & Harold A. Henderson, CG Records created by the major Christian denominations before 1900 in the United States are an underutilized resource for family historians. In these records, you may find ancestors’ births, maiden or married names, marriage details, deaths, family relationships,[…]Read more

Posted on 5 Comments
New Genealogy Books

New Summer Genealogy & Family History Book Releases

Our August new releases include Joseph Lee Boyle’s latest collection of transcribed runaway servant newspaper ads, and our first “Genealogy at a Glance” publication to cover a Scandinavian nation. Please read on for details. “Fond of liquor, dancing and gaming.” New-York Runaways, 1769-1783, by Joseph Lee Boyle This work marks the second and concluding volume[…]Read more

Posted on Leave a comment
New Genealogy Books

New Releases Include Guide to Jewish Genealogy, Book Documenting New York Runaway Servants, and revised GAAG for Pennsylvania

Although the term Ashkenaz originally referred to a place now in Germany, it is broadly used these days to refer to all European Jews. This guide is intended as an aid to researchers who are searching for Ashkenazic Jewish ancestors from Eastern Europe who immigrated to the United States primarily between 1880 and 1924.  In[…]Read more

Posted on Leave a comment

New Spring Releases from Genealogical.com

Our spring releases feature works on the intersection of genetics and genealogy, the Revolutionary War, runaway servants, and Scottish emigration—all of them by repeat authors. DNA has become the hottest aspect of American genealogy. Accordingly expert geneticist-genealogist Angie Bush has revised her popular research aid, “Genetic Genealogy Basics.” Potentially just as popular, Jack Crowder has[…]Read more

Posted on Leave a comment
New Genealogy Books

Also New This Spring . . . Two New Books from Dr. David Dobson

Anglo-Dutch Links, 1560-1860 Social and economic links between the Netherlands and England have existed from the medieval period.  During the early modern period, from the Reformation onwards, these links intensified when the two countries united in opposing a common enemy in the shape of Spain. At other times economic rivalry led to war between England[…]Read more

Posted on Leave a comment
New Genealogy Books November 2019

More New Book Releases for November

Last week we wrote about a major new resource for Connecticut genealogy, Linda MacLachlan’s Finding Early Connecticut Vital Records: The Barbour Index and Beyond. MacLachlan shows that Barbour and his staff omitted any number of sources researchers should know about, and her book is the complete inventory of Connecticut vital records. Besides Ms. MacLachlan’s groundbreaking[…]Read more

Posted on Leave a comment