Understanding Spanish Abbreviations in Historic Documents

Understanding Spanish Abbreviations in Historic Documents

English-speaking researchers and historians working with Spanish documents, as well as native speakers unfamiliar with early Spanish handwriting, face two hurdles—understanding the handwriting and vocabulary, and grasping the records’ institutional, historic, social, and cultural context. The new book, Mastering Spanish Handwriting and Documents: 1520-1820, by George R. Ryskamp, Peggy Ryskamp and H. Leandro Soria, addresses[…]Read more

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Handling Secrets & Sensitivities When Writing Family Histories,

Handling Secrets & Sensitivities When Writing Family Histories, By Michael J. Leclerc, CG

(Excerpted from Michael J. Leclerc, “Crafting Family Histories,” Elizabeth Shown Mills, ed.,Professional Genealogy: Preparation, Practice & Standards (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 2018), 519–44.) Writing family histories is one of the most meaningful ways we can communicate the results of our research to our family members and even ourselves. Our projects can be large or small.[…]Read more

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How to Make Greater Use of Library Resources

GENERATION BY GENERATION Teaches Genealogists How to Make Greater Use of Library Resources

As we have noted previously Drew Smith, the author of our how-to book Generation by Generation, is a highly trained librarian as well as an accomplished genealogist. Readers of his book are destined to learn about the wealth of information that could lead them to hard-to-find ancestors by utilizing library and archival sources. To illustrate[…]Read more

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Royal Descents of 900 Immigrants to the American Colonies, Quebec, and the United States. Second Edition

Royal News Since the Release of Royal Descents of 900 Immigrants to the American Colonies, Quebec, and the United States. 2nd Edition, by Gary Boyd Roberts. PART TWO

(Part One of this article can be found HERE) In early November 2022, various scholars learned of and purchased Weston Pedigree Reconsidered: A Review of Documentation Provided by the College of Arms (2022) by Shawn Henry Potter and Lois Carol Potter. In a much earlier form, parts of this monograph were submitted to the New[…]Read more

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Uses, Value and Limitations of Census Research

“The Researcher’s Guide” Explains Uses, Value and Limitations of Census Research

As we have noted on a number of occasions, Val D. Greenwood’s Researcher’s Guide to American Genealogy discusses and explains in detail all the major sources for genealogy research in the U.S. The volume devotes two chapters to census records that explain the contents of and differences between the official U.S. censuses 1790-1940, colonial censuses,[…]Read more

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Citing Titles: Basic Rules

“Citing Titles: Basic Rules,” by Elizabeth Shown Mills

[Excerpted from Elizabeth Shown Mills, Evidence Explained: Citing History Sources from Artifacts to Cyberspace, 3d ed. rev. (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 2017), pp. 52–53, §2.22–2.23.] “Six basic rules govern our citation of titles, regardless of the type of record or publication we are using: 1) BOOK, CD, DVD, JOURNAL, MAP, WEBSITE, ETC. For published stand-alone[…]Read more

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Groundbreaking Book for Genealogists with Hispanic Roots

Groundbreaking Book for Genealogists with Hispanic Roots

English-speaking researchers and historians working with a Spanish-language document face two hurdles—understanding the handwriting and vocabulary, and grasping the record’s institutional, historic, social, and cultural context.  This book’s unique and detailed content fills both needs.  With images, charts, transcribed documents and in-depth commentary, Mastering Spanish Handwriting and Documents: 1520-1820 addresses fundamental handwriting concepts and challenges[…]Read more

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DNA for Native American Ancestry

Book Lays Out Ground Rules for Determining Native American Ancestry

DNA for Native American Ancestry, by Roberta Estes, begins by discussing fundamental issues involved in establishing Native American heritage. The author first defines the concept of “indigenous people.” She then answers questions like “Can DNA Results Identify a Tribe?” and “Can I Join a Tribe?”. Another section covers the requirements and benefits of tribal membership,[…]Read more

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If Your Ancestor Owned Land, Then There’s a Deed

“If Your Ancestor Owned Land, Then There’s a Deed,” by William Dollarhide

Dollarhide’s Genealogy Rule #23: Locating the county where your ancestor lived is the first step in finding records about the time he was hauled into court for shooting his neighbor’s dog, threatening the census taker with a shotgun, or making illegal corn whiskey behind the barn. A 90-Percent Chance Since the first colonists came to[…]Read more

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Citing the Source of a Source, by Elizabeth Shown Mills

Citing the Source of a Source, by Elizabeth Shown Mills

(Excerpted from Elizabeth Shown Mills, Evidence Explained: Citing History Sources from Artifacts to Cyberspace, 3d ed. rev. (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 2017), pp. 52, 180, §2.21, 4.6.) In the following excerpt from her acclaimed book, Evidence Explained: Citing History Sources from Artifacts to Cyberspace. 3rd Edition Revised, Elizabeth Shown Mills explains why researchers should avoid[…]Read more

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