Tax lists and Genealogy

Tax Lists and Genealogy

Are you getting the most out of tax lists for your genealogy research? Do you even know where to start? As Cornelius Carroll states in the beginning of his book, The Beginner’s Guide to Using Tax Lists, “Tax lists are one of the most valuable, but most neglected sources of genealogical information. They cannot only be[…]Read more

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Map of Colonial Maryland

Origins and Descendants of White Slave Children of Colonial Maryland and Virginia

Editor’s Note: The following post is written by Genealogical Publishing Company author Dr. Richard Hayes Phillips. His books tread into territory that has been previously underreported, colonial white slave children. In his post below, Dr. Phillips discussing some of his research efforts that went into the making of White Slave Children of Colonial Maryland and Virginia: Birth and[…]Read more

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Immigrant Family Looking at New York Skyline

Interview with Val Greenwood about the new 4th Edition of The Researcher’s Guide to American Genealogy

[av_image src=’http://genealogical.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/TheResearchersGuidetoAmericanGenealogy-sml-199×300.jpg’ attachment=’3793′ attachment_size=’medium’ align=’left’ styling=” hover=’av-hover-grow’ link=’manually,https://library.genealogical.com/printpurchase/3napy’ target=’_blank’ caption=’yes’ font_size=” appearance=’on-hover’ overlay_opacity=’0.4′ overlay_color=’#000000′ overlay_text_color=’#ffffff’ animation=’left-to-right’ admin_preview_bg=” av_uid=’av-7f6kfd’] VIEW BOOK DETAILS [/av_image] Val D. Greenwood, the author of the new 4th edition, of the acclaimed Researcher’s Guide to American Genealogy, has devoted much of his adult life to advancing the study of genealogy. Mr. Greenwood is a native[…]Read more

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Early South Carolina History

Early South Carolina History

In 1663, England’s King Charles II ceded the Carolinas to Anthony Ashley Cooper and seven other proprietors who had supported the Stuarts in ending the Cromwellian Revolution and returning Charles II to the throne. Although the Crown did not divide the Carolinas into two quasi-self-governing regions until 1691, British colonists established the first permanent settlement[…]Read more

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new york state census

Fill in the Census Records Research Gaps

Utilizing census records are a fundamental resource for any genealogists. There are two situations discussed here where the federal census records leave information gaps. Namely, when you’re searching for a relative before the federal census of 1790, and when you can’t find someone you know should show up on a federal census. A relative who predates[…]Read more

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Lincoln Family Cemetery

Locating and Visiting Cemeteries

Editor’s note: The following post is by William Dollarhide, who has not only provided excellent tips of both the serious and witty variety, but is an accomplished Genealogical Publishing Company author. As Mr. Dollarhide excels not only an author but also as a gifted speaker and award winning genealogist, we are always delighted to share his[…]Read more

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county boundaries

Census Records and County Boundary Changes

Editor’s note: The following post on the importance of knowing the county in order to properly utilize census records, and how shifting boundaries can affect that search, is written by author William Dollarhide. An excellent source that can be used to visualize the county boundaries for every county in the U.S. and for each census year[…]Read more

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Census Example

Canadian Census Tips from Denise Larson

The following post is from author, Denise Larson, who has offered her expertise on other topics such as Maine Genealogy in two parts, as well as the recently posted piece about Canada’s upcoming anniversaries (from 2016). This year, 2016, marks the sesquarcentennial—350th anniversary—of the first official census taken in Canada. Only 163 pages long and enumerated in part by[…]Read more

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Genealogy Collection

You Have To Get Out of the Genealogy Collection!

By Carolyn L. Barkley I first heard these attention-getting words from frequent national genealogical conference speaker, Paul Milner. As both a librarian and a researcher, I could not agree more. Many customers come into a library and ask “Where is your genealogy collection?” These customers may lack well-developed search strategy skills, may think that all[…]Read more

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