DNA for Native American Ancestry

New Book Lays Out Ground Rules for Determining Native American Ancestry

Our new publication, DNA for Native American Ancestry, by Roberta Estes, begins by discussing fundamental issues involved in establishing Native American heritage. The author first defines the concept of “indigenous people.” She then answers questions like “Can DNA Results Identify a Tribe?” and “Can I Join a Tribe?”. Another section covers the requirements and benefits[…]Read more

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Tracing Your Roots in Eighteenth Century Newspapers

Tracing Your Roots in Eighteenth Century Newspapers, by Robert Barnes

The earliest newspapers in the United States were published starting in 1720. Printing presses were heavy and had to be imported from England. Happy was the colony that could have its own newspaper. Newspapers printed local news, news from other colonies, but news from Europe often occupied the front page. Marriages and deaths of local[…]Read more

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Companions of Champlain: Founding Families of Quebec, 1608-1635

Founding Families of Quebec, by Denise Larson

Denise R. Larson’s popular book, Companions of Champlain: Founding Families of Quebec, 1608-1635, is a skillful blend of genealogy and history. The narrative first half of the book describes the governmental, mercantile, and navigational background to Champlain’s arrival at Tadoussac in June 1608. Most of the balance of the book traces the descendancies of Champlain’s crew[…]Read more

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African American Patriots of Revolutionary War

More African American Patriots of the Revolutionary War

As we reported in December, Paul Heinegg’s new book, List of Free African Americans in the American Revolution: Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Maryland, and Delaware (Followed by French and Indian Wars and Colonial Militias), presents the service or pension records of nearly 1,000 free African Americans who served in the War for Independence from[…]Read more

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Flax Growers

New Pocket Guide a Great Source for 17th- and 18th-Century Irish Census Substitutes

Brian Mitchell’s New Pocket Guide to Irish Genealogy is a wonderful combination of how-to book, guide to sources, and case studies–in only 120 pages. It’s expert genealogist Mitchell’s contention that the most important sources for Irish genealogy are the civil registers of births, marriages, and deaths; church registers of baptisms, marriages, and burials; gravestone inscriptions;[…]Read more

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Meeting Lineage Society Requirements: Part 1

Meeting Lineage Society Requirements: Part 1

By Barbara J. Mathews, CG, FASG, and Darcie Hind Posz, CG(Excerpted from Professional Genealogy: Preparation, Practice & Standards) Societies exist for the sake of their society—not necessarily for the sake of genealogy. Each lineage and hereditary society has a different objective, mission statement, and purpose. Because criteria for applications are not one-size-fits-all, we need to[…]Read more

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DNA for Native American Genealogy

DNA for Native American Genealogy: Comprehensive Guide to Indigenous Roots

Did you know that the Navajo and related tribes migrated from Northwest Canada and present-day Alaska to present-day Arizona and New Mexico, and ultimately southeastern Utah, roughly 600 years ago? Would it surprise you to learn that the indigenous people of Hawaii are closely related to indigenous people of the Pacific Islands, Polynesia, Australia, and[…]Read more

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Meeting Lineage Society Requirements: Part 2

Meeting Lineage Society Requirements: Part 2, Standards

By Barbara J. Mathews, CG, FASG, and Darcie Hind Posz, CG(Excerpted from Professional Genealogy: Preparation, Practice & Standards) NB: Part One of this article covering lineage society membership, which appeared in the October 19 issue of “Genealogy Pointers,” covered the process of completing a lineage society application. Part Two picks up with the crucial process[…]Read more

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Two Rules to Break in Genealogical Research

Two Rules to Break in Genealogical Research, by Elizabeth Shown Mills

“The Name’s the Same” Rule: Identifying people is a significant challenge for historical writers—particularly people who played minor roles in an event or lived low-key lives. When we encounter records that bear the right name, in the right place and time, it is tempting to assume the record applies to our person of interest. The[…]Read more

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