Genealogy Tips

Genealogical Facts, Assertions & “The Truth”

[Excerpted from Elizabeth Shown Mills, Evidence Explained: Citing History Sources from Artifacts to Cyberspace, 3d ed. rev. (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 2017), pp. 18–22, §1.4, 1.11.] Our latest excerpt from Elizabeth Shown Mills’ classic work, Evidence Explained: Citing History Sources from Artifacts to Cyberspace, is one we would all do well to contemplate regularly as we  conduct our research,[…]Read more

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DISCOVER MORE . . . Elizabeth Shown Mills, America’s Most Influential Genealogist

Genealogy audiences on three continents have dubbed Elizabeth Shown Mills “The SuperGenie,” “The Pied Piper of Family History,” “The Mother of Modern Genealogy,” and “the genealogist who has had the greatest impact on American genealogy in the post-ROOTS era.” For over 30 years, Mrs. Mills has pushed the cutting edge of research methodology, standards, and quality,[…]Read more

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Creating a Research Plan to Solve Our Research Problem

By Laura Murphy DeGrazia, CG Excerpted from Laura Murphy DeGrazia, “Problem Analyses & Research Plans,” Elizabeth Shown Mills, ed.,  Professional Genealogy: Preparation, Practice & Standards (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 2018), 295–316. Publisher’s Note: Last week we ran an excerpt from Laura Murphy DeGrazia’s chapter, “Problem Analyses & Research Plans,” published in Professional Genealogy: Preparation, Practice &[…]Read more

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Genealogy Analysis

“Assessing Genealogical Information,” By Thomas W. Jones, Ph.D., CG, CGL, FASG

The following article was excerpted by Elizabeth Shown Mills, editor, from Professional Genealogy: Preparation, Practice & Standards (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 2018), pp. 265–92. Genealogists think about the information they find and what it might say or imply about the past. They assess both information and the sources that contain the information. These assessments usually[…]Read more

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Assessing Genealogical Sources

Assessing Genealogical Sources—Part 2

By Thomas W. Jones, Ph.D., CG, CGL, FASG  From time to time we have excerpted portions of the extraordinary book, Professional Genealogy: Preparation, Practice & Standards. Edited by Elizabeth Shown Mills, one of America’s most respected genealogy authorities, and written by eighteen leading experts on the substance of genealogical research, Progen PPS is a priceless[…]Read more

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Proof Argument

Proof, Proof Statements, Proof Summaries & Proof Arguments, by Elizabeth Shown Mills

In the following excerpt from her acclaimed book, Evidence Explained: Citing History Sources from Artifacts to Cyberspace. 3rd Edition Revised, Elizabeth Shown Mills explains that the terms proof, source, and evidence have different and distinct meanings. Moreover, a proof argument in genealogy must consist of a number of demonstrable components. Whether we are reading Ms.[…]Read more

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Analyzing Genealogical Research Problems

Analyzing Genealogical Research Problems

By Laura Murphy DeGrazia, CG Excerpted from: Laura Murphy DeGrazia, “Problem Analyses & Research Plans,” Elizabeth Shown Mills, ed., Professional Genealogy: Preparation, Practice & Standards(Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 2018), 295–316. “Effective problem analysis requires a thorough understanding of three key issues. First, we must know the available sources for that problem—their accessibility, arrangement, content, and varying[…]Read more

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Reaching Genealogical Conclusions: Hypothesis, Theory & Proof

Reaching Genealogical Conclusions: Hypothesis, Theory & Proof By Elizabeth Shown Mills

The following essay concerning the nature of genealogical proof was excerpted by Elizabeth Shown Mills from her book, Evidence Explained: Citing History Sources from Artifacts to Cyberspace. 3rd ed. Rev. (2017), p. 17. In it, Mrs. Mills explains the difference between genealogical proof, theory, and hypothesis and offers a cautionary point lesson that any researcher[…]Read more

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Assessing Genealogical Sources

Assessing Genealogical Sources—Part 1

By Thomas W. Jones, Ph.D., CG, CGL, FASG  From time to time we have excerpted portions of the extraordinary book, Professional Genealogy: Preparation, Practice & Standards. Edited by Elizabeth Shown Mills, one of America’s most respected genealogy authorities, and written by eighteen leading experts on the substance of genealogical research, Progen PPS is a priceless[…]Read more

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genealogy evidence analysis

“Family History Standards,” by Elizabeth Shown Mills

Excerpted from Evidence Explained: Citing History Sources from Artifacts to Cyberspace,3d ed. rev. (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 2017), pp. 18–19, §1.5. “Modern family history (aka genealogy) draws heavily from law in its handling of evidence. However, family-history standards require a higher level of proof than does most litigation.  The justice system demands that a date[…]Read more

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Genealogy Citing Image sources

Citing Derivatives & Imaged Sources: The Basics, by Elizabeth Shown Mills

The following essay was excerpted from Evidence Explained: Citing History Sources from Artifacts to Cyberspace, 3rd ed. Rev. (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 2017), p. 47, by the author, expressly for “Genealogy Pointers.” “The range of materials and media in use today defies standardization. When we examine a publication to define the elements that need recording,[…]Read more

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COPYRIGHT BASICS

COPYRIGHT BASICS, by Judy G. Russell, J.D., CG, CGL

Elizabeth Shown Mills, editor of the reference work, Professional Genealogy: Preparation, Practice & Standards (Progen PPS), recently chose and edited a number of selections from Progen PPS for publication in “Genealogy Pointers.”  We hasten to stress that while the author of each selection is a professional genealogist, each selection should interest anyone who is serious[…]Read more

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