Royal Ancestry

The Genealogical and Scholarly Significance of Royal Descents of 900 Immigrants, by Gary Boyd Roberts

The Royal Descents 900 Immigrants to the American Colonies, Quebec, or the United States(RD 900), genealogist Gary Boyd Roberts’ magnum opus, identifies an awe-inspring number of historical figures from Continental Europe, the British Isles, or the United States who are related to millions of living descendants. Anyone descended from an immigrant in this work can[…]Read more

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Research Procedures for Genealogists

Professional Genealogy: Preparation, Practice & Standards, edited by Elizabeth Shown Mills, contains innumerable lessons and guidelines leading to successful genealogy results. Chapter 14, written by Harold Henderson covers “Research Procedures.”  Mr. Henderson divides his discussion into three sections (before, during, and after research) that describe the steps we should take when implementing a research plan.[…]Read more

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The Ancestry of the New British Royal Baby Explained in RD 900 – By Gary Boyd Roberts

Perhaps surprisingly to many readers, the new royal child—Archie Harrison Mountbatten Windsor–is descended from six of the 970 immigrants to the U.S. treated in Gary Roberts’ two-volume Royal Descents of 900 Immigrants (RD 900). The five the royal baby inherits from the late Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother or from the late Diana Princess of[…]Read more

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genealogy church records

New Guide to Church Records Explains the “What” and “Where” for Major Denominations

Sunny Jane Morton and Harold A. Henderson’s new book, How to Find Your Family History in U.S. Church Records describes the major genealogical sources for Christian denominations in existence prior to 1900. Denominations covered include: Anglican/Episcopal, Baptist, Congregational, Dutch Reformed/Reformed, various German denominations, Latter-Day Saint, Lutheran, Mennonite and Amish, Methodist, Quaker, Presbyterian, and Roman Catholic.[…]Read more

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Major Irish Genealogy Sites Online from Tracing Your Irish Ancestors. 5th Edition, by John Grenham

As we have noted previously, the most important development in Irish genealogy since Mr. John Grenham published the fourth edition of his textbook  has been the enormous strides in posting Irish family content on the Internet. This fact has guided the author in his preparation of the brand new 5th edition of Tracing Your Irish[…]Read more

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Progen PPS explains options for family history writing

Another valuable chapter in Professional Genealogy: Preparation, Practice & Standards, edited by Elizabeth Shown Mills, illustrates the different ways in which genealogists have structured their published work over the years. Chapter 22, “Crafting Family Histories,” which was written by Michael Leclerc, itemizes seven different formats for family history writing that have appeared over many decades.[…]Read more

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Map Guide Genealogy

“U.S. Counties Created or Abolished, 1920-1983,” by William Dollarhide

The following list of counties was derived from Map Guide to the U.S. Federal Censuses, 1790-1920, by William Thorndale and William Dollarhide (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1987). The original purpose of the Map Guide was to show the evolution of county boundaries from one federal census to the next; to allow a better understanding[…]Read more

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Royal Descents

How RD 900 Differs from other Recent Scholarship on Royal Descents for Americans

By Gary Roberts RD 900 differs fundamentally from the series of volumes by David Faris and Douglas Richardson (1996-1999, 2004-2013), Plantagenet Ancestry, Magna Charta Ancestry and Royal Ancestry. Faris-Richardson cover in lavish detail all (or certainly most) Plantagenet or Magna Carta descendants, a few more than 250 17th– (and a very few 18th) – century[…]Read more

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Finding Your World War I Ancestor

Suppose family legend has it that your great-grandfather served in the Polish army during World War I. If his service records have survived, you assume you will be able to find them without any trouble. In reality, however, it is not quite that simple. Between October 1914 and September 1917, for example, some Polish combatants[…]Read more

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