Citing Online Materials: The Basics, by Elizabeth Shown Mills

Citing Online Materials: The Basics, by Elizabeth Shown Mills

Online sources are publications, with the same basic elements as print publications. This core principle applies whether we are using a commercial site, a website created by an individual, or a social-networking site such as Facebook, LinkedIn, or Twitter. Within this framework, we have just four basic rules to remember: Rule 1: Most websites are[…]Read more

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U.S. Naturalization History

U.S. Naturalization History

Christina K. Schaefer’s magnificent reference, Guide to Naturalization Records in the United States, is a complete accounting of the location of U.S. naturalization records. Since the vast majority of original records are retained by local courts, the book provides a state-by-state and county-by-county inventory of naturalization records for all 50 states, U.S. territories, and Native[…]Read more

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Scottish Emigration

New Genealogy Handbook Summarizes Scottish Emigration Around the Globe

Among the valuable features readers will find in Dr. David Dobson’s new book, Scottish Genealogy: The Basics and Beyond, is a chapter devoted to Scottish emigration. Since the author is the foremost authority on the subject, researchers can bank on what he has to say about the Scottish diaspora that proceeded, primarily, from the 17th[…]Read more

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Maine Genealogy

“Genealogical Resources in Maine,” by Denise R. Larson. Part One

Just as the Smithsonian is said to be the nation’s attic, Maine is New England’s attic. Among Maine’s many treasures and whatnots are several early nineteenth-century embroidery samplers that are more than elaborate fruits and flowers surrounding a carefully stitched alphabet. The fine silk threads sewn into the linen of these special samplers sketch family[…]Read more

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Maine genealogy

“Genealogical Resources in Maine,” by Denise R. Larson. Part Two

(In the first installment of this article, Denise Larson described the historical forces and settlement patterns that form the background to Maine genealogy. In the concluding installment, she offers excellent “how-to’ and “where-to” guidance concerning how to conduct Maine genealogical research.) Great Places to Do Genealogy in Maine Of particular note in the search for[…]Read more

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Sources Not Indexed in Barbour Collection

Linda MacLachlan’s Connecticut Vital Record Book Identifies Sources Not Indexed in Barbour Collection

Writing in the Introduction to her recent volume, Finding Early Connecticut Vital Records: The Barbour Index and Beyond, author Linda MacLachlan explains the scope of her ten-year study thusly: “This book goes beyond the Barbour Index by adding six more towns to create a bibliography for all 149 Connecticut towns incorporated by 1850.  It also[…]Read more

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Copyright vs. Plagiarism vs. Fair Use

Copyright vs. Plagiarism vs. Fair Use, by Judy G. Russell, J.D., CG, CGL

Excerpted from Judy G. Russell, “Copyright and Fair Use,” Elizabeth Shown Mills, ed.,  Professional Genealogy: Preparation, Practice & Standards (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 2018), 149–72. COPYRIGHT VS. PLAGIARISM Copyright and plagiarism are distinct concepts. The major differences are these: Copyright is a legal construct that takes the form of exclusive rights held by the copyright[…]Read more

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Complete Coverage of Scottish Church and Religious Records in New Guidebook

One of the important features of Dr. David Dobson’s new book, Scottish Genealogy: The Basics and Beyond, is a comprehensive chapter on Scottish church and other religious records.  In addition to the Church of Scotland, the author covers more than a dozen denominations and smaller sects, explaining the historical origins of each church or sect[…]Read more

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