Updated Our Quaker Ancestors Brings Records Closer to the Researcher

Updated Our Quaker Ancestors Brings Records Closer to the Researcher

Many persons living today have Quaker ancestors—even though these descendants are not themselves members of the Society of Friends. Quaker records are voluminous, but, owing to the structure and concerns of the Society, they require prior explanation. And this is precisely what Our Quaker Ancestors: Finding Them in Quaker Records, by the late Ellen and[…]Read more

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New Publication Connects Americans to their Irish and Scottish Forebears

New Publication Connects Americans to their Irish and Scottish Forebears

The new consolidated edition of Scots-Irish Links [1575-1875], by David Dobson identifies over 15,000 Scots-Irish inhabitants of the Ulster Plantation, and the indexes to those two volumes name an astounding 33,000 people connected to those inhabitants. Of course, even those numbers cannot compare with the wave of Scots who transplanted to Ireland. In the 17th-century[…]Read more

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Pocahontas and Her Descendants

What do We Know About Pocahontas and Her Descendants?

“She was of a ‘Coulour browne, or rather tawnye,’ and her age was somewhere between twelve and fourteen. She probably was roundfaced, with the fore part of her ‘grosse’ and ‘thick’ black hair ‘shaven close,’ and the very long ‘thicker part’ being ‘tied in a pleate hanging down’ to her hips. Her hands almost certainly[…]Read more

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Organize and Evaluate Your Family Findings

Researcher’s Guide Illustrates How to Organize and Evaluate Your Family Findings

Engaging in genealogical research requires a commitment of time, energy, and resources. Along the way, we may invest in travel, subscribe to web sites, buy books, establish relationships and more, as we devote ourselves to unraveling the mysteries and connections of our families.  One aspect of genealogy that many hobbyists do not make a serious[…]Read more

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Frederick Maryland

Gold Standard for Maryland Research: Pioneers of Old Monocacy

The American Society of Genealogists bestows its annual Jacobus Award upon the finest work of genealogical scholarship of the preceding year. It would be hard to find a more deserving winner of its coveted Jacobus Award than the 1988 selection, Pioneers of Old Monocacy: The Early Settlement of Frederick County, Maryland 1721-1743, by Grace L.[…]Read more

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Anne (Marbury) Hutchinson

Notable Ancestors & Descendants of 17th-Century Colonists Anne (Marbury) Hutchinson & Katherine (Marbury) Scott

Anne (Marbury) Hutchinson, the 17th-century Puritan heretic and co-founder of Rhode Island, died in an Indian attack with several of her children only nine years after she arrived in America. Her surviving four children and the children of her sister Katherine (Marbury) Scott produced many descendants with royal or noble ancestors. For example, their American[…]Read more

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Libraries and the National Archives (NARA)

Genealogists Need Libraries

Chapter Five of The Researcher’s Guide to American Genealogy. 4th Edition, by Val Greenwood, is entitled “Libraries and the National Archives (NARA).” In a way the chapter title is understated because many libraries have digitized their family history holdings (e.g., personal papers, published family histories, military records, etc.) and made them available for free on[…]Read more

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How Royal Progeny Came to America

Major Reference Books Document How Royal Progeny Came to America

The system of primogeniture, the medieval practice of passing down a title and its holdings to one’s eldest son (or daughter), accounts for the fact that many Americans have royal or noble ancestors. For example, the millions of descendants of the 970 immigrant ancestors discussed in the 2018 edition of Gary Boyd Roberts’ book, The[…]Read more

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Learn About Land Records in The Researcher’s Guide to American Genealogy. Fourth Edition

Learn About Land Records in The Researcher’s Guide to American Genealogy. Fourth Edition

In the Fourth Edition of The Researcher’s Guide to American Genealogy, author Val D. Greenwood devotes three full chapters (80 pages) to the subject of land records. One chapter covers national (colonial and U.S.) land, a second one covers local land, and the third explains the formats of land record abstracts. Land records, of course,[…]Read more

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