Abstracting Genealogical Records

Abstracting Genealogical Records According to ‘The Researcher’s Guide’

In Chapter 21 of The Researcher’s Guide to American Genealogy. Fourth Edition, author Val Greenwood cautions genealogists that during ‘pick and shovel research’–when the documents we need are not online and we must go to them in person—we will be glad we know how to abstract those records. At the outset of the chapter, the[…]Read more

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Pocahontas and Her Descendants

What do We Know About Pocahontas and Her Descendants?

“She was of a ‘Coulour browne, or rather tawnye,’ and her age was somewhere between twelve and fourteen. She probably was roundfaced, with the fore part of her ‘grosse’ and ‘thick’ black hair ‘shaven close,’ and the very long ‘thicker part’ being ‘tied in a pleate hanging down’ to her hips. Her hands almost certainly[…]Read more

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Organize and Evaluate Your Family Findings

Researcher’s Guide Illustrates How to Organize and Evaluate Your Family Findings

Engaging in genealogical research requires a commitment of time, energy, and resources. Along the way, we may invest in travel, subscribe to web sites, buy books, establish relationships and more, as we devote ourselves to unraveling the mysteries and connections of our families.  One aspect of genealogy that many hobbyists do not make a serious[…]Read more

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New England Historic Genealogical Society Bestows Prestigious “Coddington Award of Merit” upon Elizabeth Shown Mills

New England Historic Genealogical Society Bestows Prestigious “Coddington Award of Merit” upon Elizabeth Shown Mills

Earlier this month, the New England Historic Genealogical Society presented Elizabeth Shown Mills with its distinguished Coddington Award of Merit. The award is named after John Insley Coddington, who, after Donald Lines Jacobus, is considered the dean of 20th-century American genealogists. The Codington award recognizes significant accomplishments and contributions in the field. Elizabeth Shown Mills,[…]Read more

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Libraries and the National Archives (NARA)

Genealogists Need Libraries

Chapter Five of The Researcher’s Guide to American Genealogy. 4th Edition, by Val Greenwood, is entitled “Libraries and the National Archives (NARA).” In a way the chapter title is understated because many libraries have digitized their family history holdings (e.g., personal papers, published family histories, military records, etc.) and made them available for free on[…]Read more

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How Royal Progeny Came to America

Major Reference Books Document How Royal Progeny Came to America

The system of primogeniture, the medieval practice of passing down a title and its holdings to one’s eldest son (or daughter), accounts for the fact that many Americans have royal or noble ancestors. For example, the millions of descendants of the 970 immigrant ancestors discussed in the 2018 edition of Gary Boyd Roberts’ book, The[…]Read more

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Updated Our Quaker Ancestors Brings Records Closer to the Researcher

Updated Our Quaker Ancestors Brings Records Closer to the Researcher

Many persons living today have Quaker ancestors—even though these descendants are not themselves members of the Society of Friends. Quaker records are voluminous, but, owing to the structure and concerns of the Society, they require prior explanation. And this is precisely what Our Quaker Ancestors: Finding Them in Quaker Records, by the late Ellen and[…]Read more

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Joseph Lee Boyle Completes Multiple Series of Runaway Servant Newspaper Ads

Joseph Lee Boyle Completes Multiple Series of Runaway Servant Newspaper Ads

No one is as familiar with personal ads placed in colonial newspapers as Joseph Lee Boyle. The retired head ranger at the Valley Forge, Pennsylvania, historic park, Mr. Boyle has spent a decade reading the classified ads that ran in 18th-century American newspapers from New England to Maryland. His findings have appeared in 20 indexed[…]Read more

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Frederick Maryland

Gold Standard for Maryland Research: Pioneers of Old Monocacy

The American Society of Genealogists bestows its annual Jacobus Award upon the finest work of genealogical scholarship of the preceding year. It would be hard to find a more deserving winner of its coveted Jacobus Award than the 1988 selection, Pioneers of Old Monocacy: The Early Settlement of Frederick County, Maryland 1721-1743, by Grace L.[…]Read more

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