Memorial Day and the Civil War Roll of Honor

The Memorial Day holiday we celebrate commemorates the Americans who lost their lives in the service of their country. The origins of the Memorial Day holiday go back to the era of the American Civil War, and they are shrouded in some controversy. The U.S. National Park Service credits women of Columbus, Georgia, with “establishing”[…]Read more

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NANCY HART, GEORGIA HEROINE OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

[av_image src=’https://genealogical.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/2018-08-23-09-33-55.14837aef052df29b5598bac3dba81885c29ca254-223×300.jpg’ attachment=’5589′ attachment_size=’medium’ align=’right’ styling=” hover=’av-hover-grow’ link=’manually,https://library.genealogical.com/printpurchase/X7Qe1′ target=’_blank’ caption=’yes’ font_size=” appearance=’on-hover’ overlay_opacity=’0.4′ overlay_color=’#000000′ overlay_text_color=’#ffffff’ animation=’no-animation’ admin_preview_bg=” av_uid=’av-6bupis’] View Book Details [/av_image] The following account of Revolutionary War heroine Nancy Hart of Georgia is excerpted from our new book, Women Patriots of the American Revolution, by Jack Crowder. Mr. Crowder highlights about 90 women who[…]Read more

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Jamestown

Unprecedented Biographical Dictionary of Early Virginia Immigrants

Martha McCartney uses recent historical scholarship as she sets the stage in her remarkable book, Virginia Immigrants and Adventurers, 1607-1635: A Biographical Dictionary. We’re focusing on this unprecedented trove of information, formatted as an easy to use biographical dictionary of early Virginia immigrants, and sharing an excerpt from the book.  Soon after the fateful landing of 1607, thousands[…]Read more

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Virginia Immigrants and Adventurers, 1607-1635: A Biographical Dictionary: Unprecedented Biographical Dictionary of Early Virginians

“On May 13, 1607, Virginia’s first colonists came ashore on what became known as Jamestown Island. The next day, they commenced establishing an outpost they called James Cittie or Jamestown, the first permanent English settlement in the United States. The 104 colonists were unaware that they had arrived at the close of the most severe[…]Read more

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Early South Carolina History

Early South Carolina History

In 1663, England’s King Charles II ceded the Carolinas to Anthony Ashley Cooper and seven other proprietors who had supported the Stuarts in ending the Cromwellian Revolution and returning Charles II to the throne. Although the Crown did not divide the Carolinas into two quasi-self-governing regions until 1691, British colonists established the first permanent settlement[…]Read more

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Find Ten Things Wrong with the Painting

Readers of this newsletter know that author Jack Crowder is a dedicated student of the American Revolution. In the last six months, we have published two of Jack’s books on the subject. In Women Patriots of the American Revolution, Jack Crowder highlights roughly 90 women who went beyond the norm in supporting America’s struggle for[…]Read more

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Five Civilized Tribes

Federal Records of the Five Civilized Tribes

The following excerpt is from the book, Tracing Ancestors Among the Five Civilized Tribes, by Rachal Mills Lennon. This body of work has been the best-selling guide to a very difficult area of research for over a decade. Ms. Lennon, M.A., CG, specializes in resolving difficult Southern research problems and reconstructing obscure lives, especially those of Native[…]Read more

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Map of Colonial Maryland

Origins and Descendants of White Slave Children of Colonial Maryland and Virginia

Editor’s Note: The following post is written by Genealogical Publishing Company author Dr. Richard Hayes Phillips. His books tread into territory that has been previously underreported, colonial white slave children. In his post below, Dr. Phillips discussing some of his research efforts that went into the making of White Slave Children of Colonial Maryland and Virginia: Birth and[…]Read more

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